Trail Frog

Animals, Photographyon November 23rd, 200916 Comments

16 Responses to “Trail Frog”

  1. Phil says:

    Is that an Alaskan trail frog(also known as Jesus frog)?

  2. Tyler says:

    I hear they have fangs.

  3. Phil says:

    Thats true. Plus they are known for their elusiveness and rarity. The entire population is suspected to be less than 300 in the world. After some research and a little back and forth debate with my esteemed colleagues it is determined that the picture above is actually a bumpy skinned finger toad, native to only two small divided areas in the US. One being the panhandle of New Mexico and the other somewhere in Pennsylvania.
    But more on the Alaskan trail frog, I am going to get a feel for a search expedition and see if we can get funding. If you are interested in coming aboard I can always use some help.

  4. Tyler says:

    That looks more like a Haitian Shaking Toad actually, which is a close realitive to the Alaskan Trail Frog. The Shaking Toad, while less elusive, is equally rare and treasured by many in the western regions of Brazil.
    Phil, count me in on your expedition. If we can find breeding habitats for teh Alaskan Trail Frog it would be a significant scientific discovery and likely yeild great value to the entire amphibious scientific community.

  5. Courtney Cordaro says:

    Hi Phil I don't believe it is an Alaskan Trail Frog as you found out, I named the image that because of where we found it. We had been hiking on a trail in upstate New York, picked it up and took the photo. So my guess is it is likely to be the Bumpy Skinned Finger Toad, since he could have migrated from PA to NY. Would have been cool if it did have fangs though.

  6. Phil says:

    Tyler, You really know your Amphibians.
    I think that we can really help offset some of the expense of this expedition by tracking the Alaskan tundra snake in hopes to milk its venom gland and selling a couple of vials to the Canadians who use this precious fluid as an ingredient in their hockey skate polish. 3 ounces would fetch upwards of a million dollars, putting us in a good position in the field so we could focus on the mating rituals and as you mentioned breeding habits of the ATF.

    I feel like this is the start of a beautiful amphibifriendship 🙂

  7. Tyler says:

    Courtney, I don't know…it could be the Alaskan Trail Frog. They have been found as far easy as Newfoundland so there is no doubt it could have made its way slightly south into the states.

    And yes, fangs ftw.

  8. Lloyd Evans says:

    Phil and Tyler,

    This is great news! I was forwarded a link to this site by one of my co-workers. I think that it is great that there are still people passionate about the little creatures out there. My fellow researchers and I would be happy to help you in your endeavors to learn more about the Alaskan trail frog. If you wouldn't mind coming up with a detailed plan for your research, I think we may be able to allocate some research dollars your way, in exchange for a few specimens for repopulation purposes. I look forward to dealing with both of you in the near future.

    Lloyd Evans
    Professor of Amphibious Biology
    Southwest University
    lloyd_evans@swu.edu

  9. Phil says:

    We should really acknowledge this blogger for their excellent photo. I have heard that in some circles it is considered rude to just sit and have a good old chat on someones blog. So thank you blog person and please know that you might possibly have helped make an amazing thing happen.
    I must go and pack for my journey.
    Phillip Oliver Pantalones
    Apprentice Scientist
    NDSU
    Poo_Pants@nodak.edu

  10. Courtney Cordaro says:

    Well glad to have my photo be such great help to you all. If you do in fact find out what exactly this is definitely I'd love to know. Also, Phil would you happen to know how it is you co-worker found this photo in the first place? Perhaps by just doing a google search for the word trail frog? I'm just curious to find out how it came up and became such an interesting topic for all of you.

  11. Phil says:

    Turns I just love love love frogs!

  12. Philbert says:

    Rather what I meant to say was that it turns out that I just Love frogs. It was forwarded to me by someone who caught the mention of the Alaskan Trail frog in a conversation on Facebook and then they googled it and yours came up since it said Trail Frog. You see we havent seen a recent (and by recent I mean in the digital camera age) photo of an actual Alaskan trail frog. Even though this is not what we are looking for it was quite exciting to think about so I ventured over to your blog and we just started chatting back and forth as our IT department cannot catch wind of what we are up to or it would get over to HR and then we would lose our jobs. So thank you for facilitating this communication. Please feel free to delete the conversation.

  13. Tyler says:

    I would most prefer the convo is not deleted, as it is a solid and true testament to the Alaskan Trail Frog.

  14. Phil says:

    Turns I just love love love frogs!

  15. Philbert says:

    Rather what I meant to say was that it turns out that I just Love frogs. It was forwarded to me by someone who caught the mention of the Alaskan Trail frog in a conversation on Facebook and then they googled it and yours came up since it said Trail Frog. You see we havent seen a recent (and by recent I mean in the digital camera age) photo of an actual Alaskan trail frog. Even though this is not what we are looking for it was quite exciting to think about so I ventured over to your blog and we just started chatting back and forth as our IT department cannot catch wind of what we are up to or it would get over to HR and then we would lose our jobs. So thank you for facilitating this communication. Please feel free to delete the conversation.

  16. Tyler says:

    I would most prefer the convo is not deleted, as it is a solid and true testament to the Alaskan Trail Frog.